Your 2021 Tax-Preparation Checklist

Your 2021 Tax-Preparation Checklist

| February 03, 2021
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With everything 2020 has thrown at us, the last thing you probably feel like doing is thinking about taxes. But, like it or not, tax season is here, and the better prepared you are, the sooner you can shake off that stress and spend your time doing what you love instead. And since there’s nothing worse than getting close to finalizing your taxes only to realize you are missing an important document, we’ve created a tax-preparation checklist for you to follow to help make sure you have all your ducks in a row.

Gather Your Personal & Income Information

You’ve probably already started receiving various tax documents in the mail or virtually, so instead of letting them sit in a pile on your counter, create an organized system for the following.

Income Information

  • Form W-2: These are issued by employers and show your wages and tax withholdings. They are supposed to be mailed by January 31.
  • Form 1099-MISC: These report income you have received as an independent contractor or freelancer. You should receive one from each person or company that pays you.
  • Form 1099-INT: This form will show any interest you have earned.
  • Form 1099-R: This form reports income received from annuities, IRAs, or pensions.
  • Form 1099-DIV: Any dividend income you earn is reported on this form.
  • Form 1099-B or 1099-S: You will receive these if you have any income from the sale of property or stock.
  • Form 1098: You will get this from your mortgage company reporting the interest that you paid.
  • Form 1098-T: This reports payments of qualified tuition and expenses.
  • Form 1095-A or 1095-C: These forms report your healthcare coverage for the year and your premium tax credit, if applicable.
  • Schedule K-1 (Form 1065, Form 1120S, or Form 1041): This reports income for a partner, a shareholder, or an income beneficiary of an estate or trust. The Schedule K-1 normal deadline can be as late as April 15th. 

Personal Information

If you want your tax-filing experience to be painless, you’ll also want to make sure that you have all of your and your dependents’ personal information available, such as: 

  • Social Security numbers and birthdates
  • Copies of last year’s tax return (helpful, but not required)
  • Bank account number and routing number, if you wish to have your refund deposited directly into your account

Income-Reduction Documents

  • Form 1098-E for student loan interest paid, or loan statements for student loans received
  • Form 1098-T for tuition paid or receipts from the institution you or your dependents attend
  • Receipts for any qualifying energy-efficient home improvements
  • Records of IRA contributions made during the year
  • SEP, SIMPLE, and other self-employed pension plan information
  • Records of medical savings account (MSA) contributions
  • Moving expense records
  • Self-employed health insurance payment records
  • Alimony you paid

Organize Your Documents For Itemization

Also, if you itemize your deductions, you’ll need records to include your totals and provide proof. 

Deductions And Credits

  • Childcare costs: provider’s name, address, tax ID, and the amount paid
  • Education costs: Form 1098-T, education expenses
  • Adoption costs: SSN of the child; records of legal, medical, and transportation costs
  • Form 1098: Mortgage interest, private mortgage insurance (PMI), and points you paid
  • Investment interest expenses
  • Charitable donations: cash amounts and official charity receipts
  • Medical and dental expenses paid
  • Casualty and theft losses: the amount of damage, insurance reimbursements
  • Records/amounts of other miscellaneous tax deductions: union dues; unreimbursed employee expenses (uniforms, supplies, seminars, continuing education, publications, travel, etc.)
  • Records of home business expenses

Taxes Paid

  • State and local income tax
  • Real estate tax
  • Personal property tax

Consider Possible Changes

Okay, so that’s the nitty-gritty of what you’ll need in front of you to thoroughly fill out your tax return. But there are also a few things to think about that could impact how you file, such as any changes that have occurred this year. Did you add another child to your family? Did one of your children start college? Did you start taking withdrawals from a retirement account? All of these changes need to be reflected on your tax return but won’t show up on prior returns.

More than personal changes, there may be changes to federal or state tax law that you should be aware of. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act tax reform bill of 2017 is still being implemented, and the new SECURE Act could also affect your 2020 tax situation.

Specifically, you should stay on top of annual changes to retirement plan contribution limits. For the 2020 tax year, you can put up to $6,000 in any type of IRA. If you are over age 50, that amount goes up to $7,000 thanks to the $1,000 catch-up contribution. Annual contribution limits for 401(k)s, 403(b)s, the federal Thrift Savings Plan, and most 457 plans also increased by $500 for 2020. The new annual limit on contributions is $19,500. If you are 50 or older, your yearly contribution limit goes up to $26,000. And if you are eligible to contribute to an HSA, you can save $3,550 if you have single medical coverage and $7,100 if you are covered under a qualifying family plan. If you are 55 or older, those limits go up another $1,000. Keep in mind that for IRAs and HSAs, you have until April 15th, 2021, to contribute for the 2020 tax year. 

A knowledgeable financial professional can help you understand any tax law changes and how they affect you.

Make A Plan For The Future

While it’s important to get your 2020 tax return filed properly, it’s just as important to look at the bigger picture of taxes in general. Are you optimizing all of the tools available to you to limit your tax liability? Are there steps that you could take now to minimize future taxes? Do you have a plan for your tax refund that will further your overall financial goals?

Working with an experienced tax professional who understands the unique challenges presented during tax season can help maximize your opportunities. Together, we can work toward your overall financial plan and optimize all of your available tools to limit your tax liability.

If you want to be proactive about tax planning and you don’t have a trusted advisor yet, our team at HBA Wealth would love to help you experience confidence in every aspect of your financial plan. Reach out to us at (626) 529-8347 or email Ricky directly at ricky@hbawealth.com to schedule an appointment and get started!

About Haydel, Biel & Associates

Haydel, Biel & Associates is an independent financial advisory firm serving individuals and families near Pasadena, California. The firm was founded in 2004 by Chris Haydel and Ricky Biel with a desire to provide unbiased, client-centered, community-based financial advice. Together, they have built a practice that has grown into a family of caring, smart professionals committed to blending proven investment methodologies with creative financial technologies that make it easier than ever to accomplish your goals. They strive to keep things simple and fun to give their clients peace of mind and alleviate financial stress. HBA Wealth takes care of their clients’ needs first and foremost and goes the extra mile to make their clients’ finances grow. To meet and see how the HBA Wealth team may be able to help, contact them today at (626) 529-8347 or email Ricky directly at ricky@hbawealth.com.

The commentary on this blog/website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Haydel Biel & Associates employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by  Haydel Biel & Associates or performance returns of any  Haydel Biel & Associates Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securs, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Haydel Biel & Associates manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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